Many people read these just

Added: Averill Presswood - Date: 09.12.2021 04:00 - Views: 23771 - Clicks: 6263

And when people reach for a book, it is much more likely to be a traditional print book than a digital product. But while print remains at the center of the book-reading landscape as a whole, there has been a distinct shift in the e-book landscape over the last five years.

Americans increasingly turn to multipurpose devices such as smartphones and tablet computers — rather than dedicated e-readers — when they engage with e-book content. The share of e-book readers on tablets has more than tripled since and the of readers on phones has more than doubled over that time, while the share reading on e-book reading devices has not changed. And smartphones are playing an especially prominent role in the e-reading habits of certain demographic groups, such as non-whites and those who have not attended college.

These are among the main findings of a nationally representative telephone survey of 1, American adults conducted March 7-April 4, Following a slight overall decline in book readership between andthe share of American adults who read books in any format has remained largely unchanged over the last four years.

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Americans read an average mean of 12 books per year, while the typical median American has read 4 books in the last 12 months. Readers today can access books in several common digital formats, but print books remain substantially more popular than either e-books or audio books. In addition to being less popular than print books overall, the share of Americans who read e-books or listen to audio books has remained fairly stable in recent years. However, some demographic groups are slightly more likely than others to do all of their reading in digital format. As was the case in Pew Research Center surveys on book reading, certain groups of Americans read at relatively high rates and in a wide variety of formats.

These include:. College graduates — Compared with those who have not attended college, college graduates are more likely to read books in general, more likely to read print books, and more likely to consume digital-book content. The typical median college graduate has read seven books in the last year. However, men and women are equally likely to read digital-format books such as e-books and audio books. Tablet computer and smartphone ownership have each increased dramatically in recent years, and a growing share of Americans are using these multipurpose mobile devices — rather than dedicated e-readers — to read books.

Many people read these just Research Center studies have documented how several groups — such as blacks and Latinos, and those who have not attended college — tend to rely heavily on smartphones for online access. And in the context of book reading, members of these groups are especially likely to turn to smartphones — rather than tablets or other types of digital devices — when they engage with e-book content.

Cellphones also play a relatively prominent role in the reading habits of Americans who have not attended college. But these differences are much less pronounced when it comes to reading books on cellphones. In addition to asking whether — and on what devices — Americans read books specifically, the survey also included a broader set of questions asking about reasons that people might read written content of any kind including books, but also magazines, newspapers or online content.

A similar share of Americans report that they read for pleasure, for work or school, or to keep up with current events compared to the most recent time these questions were asked in In some cases, the factors associated with high rates of book readership are the same ones associated with reading for specific purposes.

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For instance, college graduates are more likely than those who have only attended high school to read books in general — and they are also more likely to read for all four of the specific motivations examined in this survey. At the same time, there is not always such a direct relationship between book reading and overall reading for specific purposes.

As noted earlier in this report, young adults are more likely to read books than older adults.

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And when asked about specific reasons why they might read a range of content, these young adults are much more likely than older adults to say that they read for work or school, or to research a specific topic of interest. However, Americans of all ages are equally likely to indicate that they read whether in book form or otherwise for pleasure or to keep up with current events. In times of uncertainty, good decisions demand good data. Please support our research with a financial contribution.

Pew Research Center now uses as the last birth year for Millennials in our work. President Michael Dimock Many people read these just why. Here are some key findings about the state of the industry in The U. Black population is growing. At the same time, how Black people self-identify is changing, with increasing shares considering themselves multiracial or Hispanic. About Pew Research Center Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research.

Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. It is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts. Newsletters Donate My. Research Topics. The share of Americans who have read a book in the last year is largely unchanged since ; more Americans read print books than either read e-books or listen to audio books Following a slight overall decline in book readership between andthe share of American adults who read books in any format has remained largely unchanged over the last four years.

These include: College graduates — Compared with those who have not attended college, college graduates are more likely to read books in general, more likely to read print books, and more likely to consume digital-book content.

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The share of Americans who read books on tablets or cellphones has increased substantially sincewhile the share using dedicated e-readers has remained stable Tablet computer and smartphone ownership have each increased dramatically in recent Many people read these just, and a growing share of Americans are using these multipurpose mobile devices — rather than dedicated e-readers — to read books. About one-in-five Americans under the age of 50 have used a cellphone to read e-books; blacks and Americans who have not attended college are especially likely to turn to cellphone — rather than other digital devices — when reading e-books Pew Research Center studies have documented how several groups — such as blacks and Latinos, and those who have not attended college — tend to rely heavily on smartphones for online access.

The share of Americans who read in order to research a specific topic of interest has increased in recent years In addition to asking whether — and on what devices — Americans read books specifically, the survey also included a broader set of questions asking about reasons that people might read written content of any kind including books, but also magazines, newspapers or online content. Older and younger adults are equally likely to read for pleasure or to keep up with current events; younger adults are more likely to read for work or school, or to research a topic of interest In some cases, the factors associated with high rates of book readership are the same ones associated with reading for specific purposes.

You are reading 1 2 3 4. Facts are more important than ever In times of uncertainty, good decisions demand good data. Defining generations: Where Millennials end and Generation Z begins. Are you in the global middle class? Find out with our income calculator.

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Many people read these just

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One-in-five Americans now listen to audiobooks